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called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
for you >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington. demonstrators gather outside an israeli prison where 26 palestinians are released just before peace talks are scheduled to start. former u.s. president bill clinton sits down with the bbc offering his view on america's struggle to feigned an alternative solution in syria. >> sometimes you are not going to win them all. >> doing nothing is better than something sometimes. >> sometimes. not always, but in this case i think yes. >> and a fireworks show brought to you by mother nature. many looked to the skies last night to see meteors flying across. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. tomorrow israeli and palestinian negotiators will meet in jerusalem to discuss peace for the first time in three years. the dialogue has been brokered by secretary of state john kerry, who insist the talks will go ahead, despite israel's announcement it is constructing new settlements. many israeli's object to the release of 26 prisoners, some in the p
>> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you are in, working for new captain. we offer sexe tees and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington. demonstrators gather outside an israeli prison where 26 palestinians are released just before peace talks are scheduled to start. former u.s. president bill clinton sits down with the bbc offering his view on america's struggle to feigned an alternative solution in syria. >> sometimes you are not going to win them all. >> doing nothing is better than something sometimes. >> sometimes. not always, but in this case i think yes. >> and a fireworks show brought to you by mother nature. many look
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
farland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting with you, the idea that the president wants to reurn, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military againstmocracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and the with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama administration. eric, in the book, you call for a move against
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
welcome t to al jazeera america. president obama considers cutting aid egypt after weeks oh of bloodshed. billions is on the line. burning up, more than 50 wild fires out of control this wes in states and they are running out of resources. >> in bangladesh, how put americans are putting lives in danger. >> we begin in egypt. the violent and bloody change of government there. the u.s. is rethinking its relationship, powerful mideast allie. president obama met with his security advisors today about possibly cutting the billions of aid to egypt. the same time the white house is condemning accusations by turkey's prime minister that israel had a hand in the overthrow of president morsi. we are watching developments in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here s
brotherhood. it's called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i am a slow reader, but i went through read in one afternoon because i could not put it down. it is such a page turner. i think number one on amazon in terms of books about the middle east. it is reading to show how this organization that was established in 1929 has managed to infiltrate into various capital throughout the restaurant -- the western world and unfortunately into our very own. it has managed to, under the obama administration, metastasize and has been influencing power. without any further ado are like to introduce you to have wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank sarah for a first of all hosting this event and the endowment for middle east troops has such phenomenal work. i looked at sarah as a modern-day esther, deborah. i really do. such a time as this to thank god for the organization and when you're doing and think of revving a year. you don't want to look at it. i know people are reading it. this is really the first book since the so-called arab spring broke out that get
america goes a long way to distinguish between radical islam and islam. >> are you making innocent americans out to be a villain right now? >> i said america goes a long way to make a distinction between radical islamist and muslims. >> are you veillainiz izizing t with this broadcast. these people are not radical islamists. these are innocent americans practicing their constitutional liberties, brother. >> i think on that day -- what what do you think? >> i haven't met a muslim that isn't offended by the exploitation of 9/11. they call this the muslim march against fear when muslims should march on ft. hood trial this week to demand for the death penalty. they should be protesting at the embassies of the saudi arabia embassy, iranian embassy and protesting all of the churches that are being burned by the muslim brotherhood and if you look at the greatest security threat to the world, it's radical muslims from within our house but you think it's appropriate to emphasize our fear in the country that gives us freedom. the march should be called how to radicalize muslims in one march.
america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's capital city has been the scene of morning, anger, and unrest after the clashes between security forces and supporters that -- of mohamed morsi. more than 600 people have died and their opponents say the number is higher. tonight the un security council is getting an emergency briefing. jeremy bowen reports from cairo on the days events. the setsrought ice up of the mops because in cairo, dead bodies decompose sought -- quickly. inside there were 200 in trouts, surrounded by their families. they blame the army commander. this is my brother,
american game. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> i have a dream. my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause] >> his words forever penned in american history. it has been 5 50 years since dr. mayor tin luther king, junior delivered his iconic i have a dream speech. this weekend tens of thousandsdiothousandsdescended o continue his vision and many warn that the advances are now in danger of being rolled back. [applause] >> the crowds in front of the lynne kl memorial did not match the 200,000 or more that watched martin luther king at the same spot a half century ago but the determination to see america redeem his vision was strong as children veronica and benisha were at the 25th anniversa
africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time the george and martha kellner chair of south asian studi
people. also white people, and to know that a nation such as america and the reason that i struggle with it so hard and i grapple with it so hard is because i really believe in the potential of this country. and this country has not realized its potential, it has not even begun to scratch the surface and the humanities. and because i do feel strongly about that potential and because of the kind of inheritance i've had, it was necessary for may to be this. >> and we are very happy to have harry belafonte joining us now on the program today from new york. mr. belafonte, looking back, what do you think about the promise of dr. king's dream, of everything you worked for? what has been achieved? what still need to bes to be ac? >> i do believe that that moment was filled with dreams of over two centuries of expectation that came from the african-american community. and a big part of the american community. we have enjoyed a great journey in achieving the victories that we did. now today i think that we are under a great threat of having those victories reversed. i think there's a new con
presence in least, in latin america, and venezuela, in the united states some have been caught smoking across the bord border. maybe doing some things again u.s. interest, other places in the world those present bigger problems for us we try to protect not only military and diplomatic interests but commercial interests has. >> thank you so much colonel bill cowen. >> thank you, lori. >> we'll have more on obama administration handling of conflict in syria later with our a team. >> on a historic anniversary, first black president shares his dream of equality in america. analyzing president obama's speech, and state of race relations in america next. lori: on wall street stocks rebounding after two days of losses, dow closed with a gain the 48, and nazdaq rose 15. 2. 7 billion shares traded hands today. precious metal, gold falling $140 an ounce after a run -- $ 1.40 an ounce after yesterday's run-up, crude oil settles just botcabove $110 a barrel. check bond market, shield on 10-year note 2.78%. falling yesterday in the safe a half know play. it is a historic day in washington, presiden
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
news at www.aljazeera.com [♪ music ] >> on america tonight. >> nothing today is more serious, and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. >> sharp words from washington leave little doubt what the u.s. thinks happened to these syrian victims. now focus turns to how and when the world will respond. >>> and the threat to california's most mighty residents. the enormous blazes that have also triggered fears for san francisco's water supply. also tonight we're keeping up the fight for chicago. a community left in a constant state of mourning and wondering how will the violence ever end? >> i'm so tired of doing funerals of young men getting killed through gun violence whether by th the police or anor gang. it just wears you down. [♪ music ] >> good evening, and welcome to america tonight. i'm ow joie chen. we start with a high stakes for the united states and the international community. it was these picture, gruesome, grizzly images, hundreds of men, women and children fell by something a week ago that has led increased pressure on damascus to explain and the european capi
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>> it's august 30th. this is a fox news alert. america loses a key ally. america's top ally now backing out. what that means about a possible strike going forward. the biggest union leader in the united states turning sour on obama care. >> when the act is put together it wasn't thought completely through. >> not thought completely through. can they win the healthcare battle with the unions jumping ship. >> it is not just your wallets with economic pain. even the tooth fairy is getting hit. kids receiving more than ever now. "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> good morning to the city who never sleeps. you can see that outside this morning. you are watching "fox & friends first" on this friday morning. i am heather nauert. >> i am patti ann browne. thank you for starting your day with us. we begin with a fox news alert. president obama in a bind after america's bigs ally backs away from taking action in syria. go to doug luzader live in washington with the latest. >> good morning. whatever coalition the president was hoping to build here now appears to be in at that timer
bombing bow- toy business. you will want to meet mo. america's news headquarters starts right now. hello, everybody. we begin with what has everyone talking this woke week. a global warning from the state department. two dozen consulates will be closed tomorrow because of a massive terrorist threat. some are questions about the timing and how the administration is handling this. molly is joining us live. >> president obama we are learning was briefed on the potential al-qaeda terrorist threat and there is two prongs of how the obama administration is handling the terror attack. warning all americans about international travel spectacularly in the midoast and north africa. and two embassies and consulates will close as a precaution. tomorrow is also president obama's birthday and the now president of iowa ran is supposed to be worn in. before the president left to play golf he got an update and he will get additional updates throughout the woke week. the embassies and consulates that will close will stretch from eastern africa to bangladesh. the u.s. picked up increased chatter that a ter
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a potential terrorism is greatest in the middle east and north africa. unrest continues to rattle that region. i spoke with michael singer, a former director of middle east affairs at the white house national security council. you have been in the room when these decisions are made. what is it, the alert of this nature? >> as a government you have information that comes across the radar, which is serious and credible. you are under an obligation to share it publicly. it seems like
, turkey, as well as israel. america does not need to act alone. we have learned this the hard way in our history that if we go it alone, we put ourselves in jeopardy. when asked in a community of countries that share the same values, we can be a lot more effective. we can bring back stability to a region that is way too unstable. >> thank you. >> an important factor to be with the next senator of new jersey is who has the experience and sophistication to deal with international questions will stop i talked about the complicated situation in that part of the world. if you pull on one, it pulls through jordan, saudi israel,egypt, palestine, and a rant, anorak, , andurkey -- and iran iraq, and turkey. i sent a letter to the president saying that he should ask the new iranian president if he is good to his word. he did appoint someone i know from their time at the united nations as foreign minister. and gives us time to work with a ran on these competent matters -- it gives us time to work with matters.hese important >> on capitol hill, in the last notle of sessions, we have seen a lot of ex
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in. working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in
field muslim empire, to go beyond that and to conquer britain conquered to conquer america. they are very explicit and to impose sharia the rule of islamic law anywhere that muslims live. some of them are violent and some of them equipped themselves with the weapons of war and terrorism. some of them are not violent but think they can conquer the west very kind of cultural takeover. we should be extremely worried by them. they are all islamists. some are violent and some are not violent. on the other hand there a lot of islamists and we must keep both in our minds. there is a difference between those who interpret the religion in a way that threatens us and those who belong in who are muslims who are themselves threatened by these islamists. we must keep those two things i think in our minds at the same time. that is what i tried to do and when i wrote my book "the world turned upside down" that was how i perceived the case which was to migrate horror or fear the british ruling class was giving in to islamism to this attempt to take over, to this attempt to undermine britai
of the house, asking how a military strike serves america's national security? tonight mr. obama spoke to judy woodruff and gwen about how close he is to taking military action. >> first of all, i've not made a decision. i have gotten options from our military, and had extensive discussions with the national security team. we are consulting with our allies, with the international community, and, you know, i have no interest in any kind of open-ended conflict in syria, but we do have to make sure that when countries break international norms on weapons like chemical weapons that could threaten us, that they're held accountable. >> reporter: the president's chief partner against assad, british prime minister david cameron has called a special session of parliament tomorrow to justify retaliating against the ve sheem. >> we have to confront something that a war crime, something that is a crime against humanity. >> reporter: despite the devastating images of dead men, women, and children that have shocked the world and u.s. claims of hard intelligence, even today a week later the syrian ambassador
made the announcement we have to act. before kerry said in front of the world the word of america is at stake. before the entire administration leaked the plan to explain exactly were it had to act. right now we are way beyond the other arguments, we are way beyond the polls. way beyond the issues, is this the best way to attack. i this it is not. the only -- >> it doesn't matter -- >> cannot be -- >> you have to listen for a second to martin dempsey if the chairman of joint chiefs of staff says to you, it doesn't matter if we go tomorrow, it doesn't matter if we go next week, we will still have an effective military strike against assad. we will hurt assad. then that open it is window to this that so many americans want to take place. >> why? there is no gap that we can hurt assad. and i don't think that the chairman of the joint chiefs is the one who decides how america should act as a way to uphold its word and strength in the region. he tells the president what to work -- what works and what doesn't. we agree it could work, depending how you design it. the question is once you
it be in america there was a sting. now that you understand you have more of a dialogue. realistically we stopped talking to our young people. hopefully it open to dialogue to take time and talk to her children. and listen to them and start by saying something like hello or giving a smile. i always say on a personal note it's an eye-opener and something we need to continue to try to embrace in our children and our community because it starts with us. thank you. >> thank you very much. >> i just want to say that that synergy i spoke of having all these organizations and these institutions all have to work together. i think that is key and perhaps your organization could be the one that starts the ball rolling and starts the communication but i think that does have to happen. >> as long as we can get some cards from you and you could give us some support that would be great. >> if i could add to that quickly also. one common thread through all of our work is we look to history and different kinds of history to find instances of structural oppression, the structural violence and racism and responses
process, but considering the breadth of america's economy and where we've been and how we have we've recovered, there's something wrong with the recovery of this recession and it's just not living up to its potential. >> well, actually, it's not as weird as you think. if you look at reinhart and the arguments from a couple of years ago, it's following the track that they said, when you have the debt-caused recessions, it's hard to get out of them. you can't afford to spend out of them. >> i see wal-mart down in earnings and macy's, cisco down on earnings and to me, it suggests a lot of problems throughout all parts of the economy. how do we turn them around? i don't know that we can afford to just bump along the way we have been. >> i'm not sure we've got an alternative. it would be good if you've got strong action from washington and fix some of our problems, that's not going to happen and get them to agree on anything. >> give me an example of some of that, quote, strong action. >> number one, we've got to do something about the long-term deficit problem in the country. we've pr
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
that america wants to be a partner in the egyptian people's pursuit of a better future, but our partnership must also advance the principles that we believe in. >> bob, that was president obama earlier today. you worked at the state department. dealt with a lot of different crises over your time there and have watched many. is the president just caught between a rock and a hard place here and did he put himself in this position? >> i don't think he put himself in a position. it is a rock and hard place. interesting thing he said there, we cannot continue as usual, which means the $1.8 billion that goes to the military, is what he's talking about. >> i don't know. >> well, don't know what? >> i think they're going to -- the white house, state department said they are going to review all of the aid that we give to egypt but, andrea, they did not say specifically they would be ending military aid, although that is on the table? >> they didn't. he also said that he doesn't take sides. president obama. and i do think he brought this upon himself because he does take sides. he took the wrong side
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
security fellow with new america foundation, thank you so much for joining us this morning. as the quest considers how to respond, disturbing new images. this is video of what is said to be a fire bomb attack near a school in the northwestern part of syria. it may have contained may palm that sticks to the skin and causes severe burns. a doctor says at least seven people were killed and dozens were injuries. al jazeera cannot independently confirm those reports. >> asaad's regime has plameed the august 21st chemical attack on rebels. on friday, the syrian government called the u.s. intelligence on the use of chemical weapons fabrication and lies. keep it here to al jazeera for continuing coverage on the crisis in syria, you can also stay up to date on our website aljazeera.com. children in unmarked graves may finally have their stories told. exhume makeses are underway in an attempt to uncover their long held secrets. beautiful weather in yosemite national park, we will tell you why that sunshine is not helping firefighters dealing with a run away wild fire burning the national treasure.
>> this is bbc world news america. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu,newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a po
will be first premier abroad. >> like most newcomers early japanese came to america full of hope. >> reporter: 340,000 japanese went to america before the second world war. many worked on farms but laws prohibited them from owning land or even becoming american citizens. >> go home, go home! >> reporter: he lived in seattle with his parents and brothers. the u.s. entered the war in 1941 after japan attacked pearl harbor. the government sent 120,000 japanese americans to internment camp in deserts and swamps. hisamil was among them. he was 10. >> we were imprisoned by barb wires and armed guard watch towers and so we lost our freedom. >> reporter: after the war, the japanese americans were released. many of them found it difficult to talk about the war. they chose to be silent. it was he from the third generation that broke the silence. the civil rights movement which started in the late '50s, prompted the younger generation to speak out. >> we will have no more of this silence! >> the silence is broken. >> the silence is broken. >> reporter: finally in the 1980s, a congressional commission fo
-year-old tad aesh yamada holds his brother's flag. it came from america. his brother died in what is now myanmar. his remains were never recovered. >> translator: when i touch this flag, all the memories of my brother come flooding back. it makes me feel so sad. >> a former american soldier knows how special these flags are to people who lost relatives. 87-year-old martin conner of new york collects hinamaru and other items to send them back to where he thinks they belong. mickey matsumoto reports. >> reporter: she holds her dead son's hinamaru. >> translator: my mother stares at the flag with tears every day. that makes me painfully aware of the horrors of war. i really hope more belongings can be returned to the familyie. >> reporter: conner has dedicated his life to searching america for the he sent more than 100 items back to families over the last 40 years. >> i just think it's the right thing to do. i know how i would feel if one of my youngsters, which i thought was gone 60, 70 years ago. >> reporter: at 18, conner joined the u.s. marine corps. he was sent to the island of
. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. [♪ music ] >> it's good to have you with us. here is a look at the top stories from around the world. japanese nuclear officials have visited the fukushima power plant to inspect a tank that is thought to be leaking radioactive water. officials at the plant have admitted that 300 tons of water has leaked from the facility. >>> i didn't want's deposed president hosni mubarak is in the hospital after being released from prison. there are large protests planned after friday prayers. >>> and chemical weapons used in syria could be seen as crimes against civilians innage alleged gas attack. >>> the number of children who are fled the war has now reached a million. ten thousand children have crossed into northern iraq. the region has become the largest growing refugee camp in the world. we're in northern iraq where many syrians have found refuge. tell us about the conditions th
valid point. >> thank you, drawing lass, senior national security fellow at the new america foundation. we do appreciate you joining us this morning. >> as the west readies for a possible military attack. u.n. secretary called for a diplomatic resolution, saying give peace and diplomacy a chance, stop acting and start talking. diplomatic he had door james bays joins us. now, a joint u.n. enjoy to syria. >> prime minister cameron and president obama have said leave it to the special envoy, the mediator, he is going to get both sides at the table. now he was asked one specific question. if there is to be a military strike on syria without the approval of the u.n. security council, would that strike be legal. he said under international law, no, it would not. >> the big question though is even after prime minister cameron submits his resolution, will the u.n. security council make a decision anytime soon? >> what you've got going on is one last try with the u.n. security council and diplomacy. two tracks are going on, one the diplomatic track, the british parliament want to show every eff
america's credibility, deter the future use of chemical weapons and, critically, be a part of our broader policy and strategy. in the senate republican john mccain said now is the time for more and better weapons to be sent to the rebels. the top republican on the arms services committee said he cannot support a strike without more information about costs and purpose. more than 100 lawmakers in the house from both parties have told president obama he must come to them to seek congressional authorization before launching a strike. >> major garrett, thanks. this morning, the u.n. secretary-general asked the west to wait until his weapons inspectors have finished looking for proof of a chemical attack. holly williams is at the turkey/syria border. holly, good morning to you. >> good morning, anthony and gayle. here on the syrian border most of the syrian refugees we've spoken to would welcome u.s. strikes against the regime. many of them have been fighting against the government in the country's civil war. inside syria, there are many people who still support th
a look at this, it's america's largest ever rocket. it blasted off from california yesterday, overnight, i think. the delta 4 rocket, 23 stories high. the blast could be heard and felt for miles. it is a top secret mission. and don't know what it's all about. we told you to fill up your gas tank before goes is going up. we told you yesterday or the day before. we were right. we'll get a prediction from the gas buddy next. how high is it going? also, the ceo of ford, alan mulally. i will guarantee he's smiling. he's here to talk about building the ford fusion in the united states. come on, alan. america loves that ford f-150, do doesn't it? that's the moneymaker. he's relentlessly upbeat. you'll see him. ♪ one piece at a time and wouldn't cost me a dime♪ ♪ you'll know it's me when i come through your town♪ >> that's a good one. [laughter] well, let's change the subject briefly. ford is building the fusion here in america. can they make money selling what they call a mid-sized car? hold on a second. ford's chief alan mulally is going to be here in just a couple of minutes. let's
>>> good morning, america. final countdown. a huge blow for the u.s., as britain bows out of an attack on syria. the white house now ready to go it alone. new details right now about the strike that could happen this weekend. >>> the nfl agrees to pay almost $800 million to thousands of players suffering from concussions on the field. but are they doing anything to prevent more injuries? we hear from one of football's most famous players. >>> i just remember asking what happened? >>> hospital horror. the unbelievable story of a brother who donated his kidney to save his sister's life. and a nurse mistakenly tossed it in the trash. we'll hear their emotional story this morning in an abc news exclusive. >>> and imagine your cherished wedding memories disappearing forever. that's what happened to hundreds when their wedding video company shut down with no one to call. this morning, one very tenacious recorder tracks down the hidden files. and with cameras rolling, we have very special reunions. >>> and good morning, america. big holiday weekend ahead. that last gasp of summer
states of america. oh, really, watch this. >> we recognize that change takes time. and that a process like this is never guaranteed. there are examples in recent history of countries that are transitioned out of a military government towards a democratic government and did not always go in a straight line and the process was not always smooth. there are going to be false starts. there will be difficult days. america's democratic journey took us through mighty struggles to perfect our union. >> a few short moments after makes those quite ignorant remarks, guess where the commander in chief was spotted. after that, he was playing golf on the golf course. which leaves me with one simple question. is he really that out of touch or does he simply not care? here to help answer the question, patrick j. buchanan, fox news analyst, juan williams. patrick j. buchanan, precipitated this. now he was lecturing the military which is getting rid of the radical islamist. is this the foreign policy that america needs? >> i think the things are out of control in cairo as far as the president is concern
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